Recipes~~Watcha Cooking?

Discussion in 'Chatter' started by clembo, Feb 27, 2021.

  1. clembo

    clembo Well-Known Member

    The dirty secret is out. I like to cook.
    A big factor in this is that I like to eat so it seemed a logical progression.

    I rarely follow recipes. Rarely measure. This is why I don't bake much. It's too precise (although I'm getting ready to make some blueberry/cherry muffins shortly).

    This in mind I figured I'd start sharing some recipes. At least the basic gist anyway and encourage you to do the same. We might give one another some ideas.


    First is a basic marinade I came up with. REAL simple and works great on chicken. For you vegetarians I figure I'll try this on some veggies as well and give them a shot on the grill.
    It also makes a mighty fine cole slaw.

    CLEMBO MARINADE
    Simplicity here. Combine about 4 ounces or so of ranch dressing, toasted sesame oil, garlic powder and the juice of one lime.
    That's it.

    Whisk the ingredients together. Be careful with the sesame oil as it is strong and can overpower the other ingredients so taste as you go. If you add too much just add more ranch dressing.

    I marinade thinly sliced skinless, boneless chicken strips in this for at least an hour. The lime juice is a natural tenderizer.
    Sautee the strips in olive oil. They cook real quick and are great over thyme rice.

    This also makes great cole slaw. I use the food processer to shred cabbage and carrot then add just a bit of finely chopped sweet onion. Combine and let sit in the fridge for a day.
    Don't add too much or it will become runny. You can always add more.

    If I want a southwestern flair I add a bit of ground cumin and ground serrano (I make this myself).

    Going to try it with some fresh ginger juice as well. Fresh ginger juice is easy if you have a garlic press. Just cut off chunks small enough to fit in the press and squeeze away.

    THYME RICE
    Tasty and simple. I actually measure this.

    For about 4-5 cups of cooked rice do the following.

    To 4 cups of chicken broth (store bought I use no salt no fat) add 3 cups of long grain rice and about 1 tsp of dried thyme.
    Bring to boil and boil for 5 minutes. Stir gently occasionally.
    Cover, remove from heat and let stand for 5 minutes.
    Fluff with fork before serving.

    You could try this with any herb you desire. I'm sure I will but for now the thyme version is very tasty.

    That's it for now but I'll add more.

    Some might seem totally bizarre or make you go EWWWW! but that's half the fun.


    So.

    What are YOU cooking?
     
    FryDaddyJr likes this.
  2. clembo

    clembo Well-Known Member

    So I made canned squid in ink sauce over pasta.
    Canned squid in ink sauce was an item on the
    Weird Canned Foods
    thread and it just so happens I saw canned squid in ink sauce at the local Meijer store.

    I said I was an adventurous eater so I gave it a shot. I'll make it again as it really was quite taste. So here you go.

    Linguine With Squid Sauce
    Serves 3 or 4.

    4 (80-gram) cans squid in ink (en su tinta)
    3 tablespoons olive oil
    2 slices bacon, chopped
    ½ onion, chopped
    2 cloves garlic, chopped
    1 red or green bell pepper, chopped
    Pinch of fennel seeds
    1/3 cup white wine
    Red pepper flakes
    ½ pound linguine or spaghetti
    Chopped parsley to garnish.


    Heat the oil in a pan and sauté the bacon, onion, garlic and bell pepper for 5 minutes. Add the fennel seeds, wine and red pepper flakes and simmer the sauce for 5 minutes. Add the contents of the cans, cutting up the pieces if necessary, and simmer another 3 minutes. Add a little water if sauce is too thick.

    Meanwhile, cook the linguine or spaghetti in ample boiling, salted water. Drain the pasta. Serve it topped with a spoonful of the squid sauce and a sprinkling of chopped parsley.

    Found this recipe on the good old internet. Changed it a bit.
    Omitted the fennel seeds as I don't have any on hand and I'm not a huge fan of fennel anyway.


    No bacon handy so I added about a tablespoon of bacon grease that I always have in the fridge.

    I also cut the bell pepper down to 1/4 of a large one. That was just enough. Bell pepper tends to overpower a dish IMHO.

    No wine (never is) so I substituted that with Sparkling Ice Ginger Lime flavor. I use the Sparkling Ice brand as a substitute for wine or beer in recipes and it's really great. Usually ginger lime but crisp apple works too.

    No linguine handy so I finished off some fettuccini and campanelle.

    Other than that I cooked as directed. I did cut the recipe in half as there's no way in hell my wife would eat it. That and I did this at about 4 am.

    The squid looked pretty nasty and smelled rather strong when I opened the can. As for the taste when done.
    Quite mild and quite tasty. I'll make it again.
     
  3. clembo

    clembo Well-Known Member

    Clembo is cheap.

    Whenever possible. So last week chicken leg quarters were on sale for 39 cents a pound.
    Even though I probably have 30 pounds (at least) of boneless, skinless breasts in the freezer I don't pass up a deal.
    It was sold in 10 pound bags but come on, 10 pounds for $3.90!

    First I made chicken stock.

    CHICKEN STOCK
    In a 16 quart stock pot add:

    The 10 pounds of chicken.
    4-5 bay leaves
    20 or so black pepper corns
    1 whole head of garlic
    1 medium onion (I used white because I had it on hand)
    2 stalks of celery.

    Add enough water to cover. Heat on low till it begins to simmer.
    Simmer at least 3 hours or so.
    Check occasionally to make sure it's not sticking. Also add more water if needed. Keep the chicken covered with water.

    Remove from heat and let cool until you can handle it.
    Remove chicken and separate meat from skin and reserve meat

    Done properly (long enough) the meat just falls off the bone.

    I cool the stock so the fat congeals and I just scoop the fat off and discard.

    There was still plenty of snow left when I made this so I just put the lid on the pot and put the whole works on a snowbank.

    After I remove the fat what's left is a bit gelatinous. Heat it up just enough to be a liquid then strain into containers.

    Now you have some killer stock. I used some to make chicken and noddle soup/stew.

    What you don't use (both chicken and stock) can be frozen for later use.

    Gotta go for now but will share my chicken noodle/stew recipe later.
     
  4. clembo

    clembo Well-Known Member

    So I've got the chicken stock.

    Time for...

    CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP/STEW
    My chicken noodle soup invariably turns out to be more of a stew. It's a vegetable catch all and great for cleaning out the fridge.

    This batch contained about 1/2 gallon of stock, lots of chicken from making the stock to which I added...

    A few cups of chopped cabbage
    Some frozen corn
    A few chopped garlic cloves
    Half a chopped sweet onion
    The remains of a head of cauliflower
    A few diced carrots

    Brought these to a simmer than added about a pound of amish noodles and finished off with a medium sized diced zucchini.

    It's never the same twice and always good.


    I realize amish noodles can't be found everywhere. I prefer a brand called Amish Made. The extra wide variety that I find at a local produce market.

    In the regular grocery store I find Essenhaus which are good as well.


    To me the key is good stock and a good hearty noodle. The rest is whatever you like.

    Go for it!
     
  5. clembo

    clembo Well-Known Member

    Going to add a new tool to my cooking this year.

    An outdoor cinder block cooking station. Easy to make and I can do it for less that $40.

    https://www.diys.com/cinder-block-fire-pits/

    I'm going with #11. I already have suitable grates from my dumpster diving exploits. I also have LOTS of cast iron.

    Coming soon to a back yard near me!;)
     
  6. clembo

    clembo Well-Known Member

    Supposed to be nice this weekend so I do believe I'm going to fire up my good old fashioned hole in the ground cooking station.

    I'm thinking some bone in chicken thighs. I have a marinade I use for chicken and pork when grilling.

    Combine equal amounts of.

    1. Olive oil
    2. Worcester sauce (Lea and Perrins)
    3. Soy Sauce (Kikkoman)
    Mix together with fresh pressed garlic, Italian seasoning and juice of 1 lemon.

    Marinate the meat at least half an hour then cook it up!

    I bought a new toy to use as well. A marinade injector. I'm going to put some marinade under the skin and see what happens.

    Foil wrapped potatoes and onions will go on the side of the coals.

    I can practically taste it now!
     
  7. FryDaddyJr

    FryDaddyJr Well-Known Member

    you should try meatless mondays
     
  8. clembo

    clembo Well-Known Member


    I actually do go meatless at times but I'm talking Saturday or Sunday here.;)
     
  9. clembo

    clembo Well-Known Member

    Sorry FD not meatless today.

    I have a new toy that I tried out yesterday. A marinade injector.

    Making the last of my skin on chicken breasts. Made a marinade of soy sauce, Worcester, butter, garlic powder, thyme and parsley. Marinated the chicken under the skin.

    The leftover marinade is in a cheap aluminum loaf pan with fresh asparagus and zucchini.

    Cooking it on a wood fire.

    YUM!:)
     
  10. clembo

    clembo Well-Known Member

    Well I bought my cinder blocks and made my cooking area.

    Works great and cost me a whopping $24.08 with tax.
    I need to work on how to cook with it. Getting the coals ready etc. but I've already used it three times.

    I did pork chops, turkey chops and kiszka (blood sausage) the first time.
    I never had kiszka before. Tastes like liver sausage which I happen to love.

    For you vegetarians I've also grilled veggies twice now.
    Onions, asparagus, zucchini, cauliflower and brussels sprouts last night.

    I love cooking over wood. As old time hockey players will tell you.

    Wood is good.
     
  11. FryDaddyJr

    FryDaddyJr Well-Known Member

    now use it to boil spaghetti or to make rice
     
  12. clembo

    clembo Well-Known Member

    I've done pot roasts using cast iron and a tripod setup so I'm sure I can manage pasta and rice on this one.
    Thinking stir fry too. I have two woks and I'm growing enough veggies.;)
     

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